Meehan’s Bartender Manual

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 “A knowledge-filled tome for true cocktail nerds or those aspiring to be” (Esquire), from one of the world’s most acclaimed bartenders
 
WINNER OF THE JAMES BEARD AWARD • WINNER OF THE TALES OF THE COCKTAIL SPIRITED AWARD® FOR BEST NEW COCKTAIL OR BARTENDING BOOK • IACP AWARD FINALIST
 
Meehan’s Bartender Manual is acclaimed mixologist Jim Meehan’s magnum opus—and the first book of the modern era to explain the bar industry from the inside out. With chapters that mix cocktail history with professional insights from experts all over the world, this deep dive covers it all: bar design, menu development, spirits production, drink mixing technique, the craft of service and art of hospitality, and more.
 
The book also includes recipes for 100 cocktails culled from the classic canon and Meehan’s own storied career. Each recipe reveals why Meehan makes these drinks the way he does, offering unprecedented access to a top bartender’s creative process.
 
Whether you’re a professional looking to take your career to the next level or an enthusiastic amateur interested in understanding the how and why of mixology, Meehan’s Bartender Manual is the definitive guide.


From the Publisher

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Martini

Origin:

Several recipes incorporating various proportions of dry gin, dry vermouth, and orange bitters appear around the turn of the century under many titles, making the Martini’s origin difficult to pin down. Frank Newman lists a ‘Dry Martini’ prepared with Martini dry vermouth in his 1904 French bar guide, American Bar, which leads me to believe the reputation of the vermouth brand had something to do with the name’s sticking.

Logic:

Before the word cocktail became the umbrella term for mixed drinks a decade ago, Martini referred to a mixed drink served up in a V-shaped glass. Over the course of the last century, the recipe has vacillated between gin and vodka mixed with varying measures of dry vermouth, served with olives, a lemon twist, or both. The words ‘wet’ (perceptible vermouth) and ‘dry’ (little to no vermouth) refer to the amount of vermouth the guest would like in the drink, with ‘dirty’ called for if they’d like olive brine added. The Martini has been shaken, stirred, and poured undiluted from a freezer into a glass sprayed with vermouth by devotees of the drink over many generations, so there’s a wide range of options to consider.

Given free rein, focus on pairing a gin and vermouth with complementary botanicals, and dial back the vermouth in your vodka Martini so the mouthfeel of the base spirit is perceptible. Choosing the right proportions of gin and vermouth, incorporating enough dilution through stirring, and serving it at the proper temperature (arctic) all distinguish a great Martini from a merely good one.

Hacks:

Most people who order Martinis make them at home or know exactly how they’d like theirs prepared, so focus your creativity elsewhere. For a nice touch, serve the drink in a smaller glass, with the balance in an iced carafe on the side and a small plate for the olives.

Recipe

Stir with ice, then strain into a chilled coupe. Twist a lemon peel over the surface and garnish with the olive.

INGREDIENTS

2.25 oz. Fords gin

0.75 oz. Dolin dry vermouth

Lemon peel

Garnish: 1 olive

Meehan’s Bartender Manual
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